Wallace Monument – Vote for #ScotlandsHeroines

In 1886 a ‘Hall of Heroes’ was added to the Wallace Monument to acknowledge the achievement of famous Scotsmen who had secured their place in Scottish History. The first two busts to be added were Robert Burns and Robert the Bruce. Over the next twenty years a further 14 busts were added – all men.

The current ‘Hall of Heroes’ © www.thewallacemonument.com

This year the Monument will be adding the first female figurehead to recognise the achievements and successes of famous Scottish women and to illustrate the roles which ‘so many women have played in the story of Scotland’.

Our own Alison McCall, Convenor of WHS, served on the selection panel which has shortlisted fourteen women who have all in their own way ‘made an outstanding contribution to the lives of countless men, women and children, in Scotland, and in countries around the world’ and ‘whose lives reflect the spirit of William Wallace’


‘Scotland’s Heroines’ Selection Panel © www.thewallacemonument.com

The shortlist is as follows:‘Scotland’s Heroines’ Shortlist © https://www.facebook.com/NationalWallaceMonument/

Arts, Culture and Sport:

  • Margaret Macdonald Mackintosh
  • Màiri Mhòr nan Òran
  • Jean Redpath
  • Nancy Riach

Science and Engineering:

  • Victoria Drummond
  • Chrystal Macmillan
  • Dorothée Pullinger
  • Mary Somerville

Medicine:

  • Elsie Inglis
  • Sophia Jex-Blake
  • Maggie Keswick Jencks

Public Life:

  • Jane Haining
  • Christian Maclagan
  • Mary Slessor

As the Wallace Monument website states ‘they have all earned the right to be recognised as Scotland’s Heroines’.

Videos of the all the women on the shortlist can also be found on the ‘Scotland’s Heroines YouTube page

You can also follow #ScotlandsHeroines on twitter:

You can find out more and place your vote at:

 http://www.nationalwallacemonument.com/scotlands-heroines/cast-your-vote/

***VOTING CLOSES ON FRIDAY 31ST MARCH***

Who will you vote for and why?

WHS Essay Prize 2016 – *Winner Announcement*

We are pleased to announce the winner of the WHS Leah Leneman Essay Prize for 2016 is Theresa Mackay (pictured below), who recently completed an MLitt in Highlands and Islands History at the University of the Highlands and Islands, supervised by Dr Elizabeth Ritchie. The competition again saw strong competition and we would like to thank the applicants for providing an interesting range of essays for the judges to consider.

Theresa won with an accomplished essay entitled: ‘Women at work: Innkeeping in the Highlands and Islands of Scotland, 1790-1840’. 

The judges write: This is a very finished piece of work which was professionally presented and clearly written. It draws on a wide range of primary and secondary sources, including private correspondence, travel memoirs, guidebooks, newspaper advertisements and even archaeological excavations. It is well illustrated with maps, paintings and photographs and provides some good quotations from the innkeepers’ guests, which helps us to ‘get inside’ this potentially difficult topic. As the author points out, less is known about the rural world, and this sits well with work on urban women and to some extent may inspire further work in the area. The case is well made for the importance of female innkeepers as entrepreneurs who laid the foundations for the tourism industry in the Highlands and Islands after 1840. On balance, this is an entertaining and instructive essay, and fully merits the award of the Essay Prize.

We would like to congratulate Theresa for her interesting and thought-provoking work, and hope to see her essay published in due course.

We are delighted that Theresa’s research has already recently featured on the BBC news website – ‘The ‘tough, entrepreneurial women’ who ran Highland inns‘.

In the Scotsman:

The 19th Century Highland inn – and the “peacekeeping” women behind the bar

and on BBC Radio 4’s Women’s Hour (at around 34:45 minutes in):

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b08dmknp

Great coverage for Theresa’s work and for Women’s History Scotland!

WHS members might like to know that several previous Leah Leneman prize essays have been published in the Journal of Scottish Historical Studies.

The next competition will be in 2018, with a deadline in December.

 

#historybooksbywomen

This weekend #historybooksbywomen has been ‘trending’. This is in response to the fact that many of the ‘history books of the year’ lists published in the broadsheets are dominated by male historians.

Here at WHS we all have plenty of recommendations for #historybooksbywomen including our own publications (click on image for details):

  

and those of our steering committee:

  gender-and-the-urban-experience 

Recommendations from 2016 would have to include our very own Eilidh MacCrae’s Exercise in the Female Life Cycle in Britain, 1930-1970 and the second edition of Lynn Abrams’ Oral History Theory.

 

What are your recommendations?

Out gallivanting – Larry Herman, Street Level Photoworks

Another month, another excellent photographic exhibition in Glasgow.

A couple of weeks ago I was in Glasgow city centre and thought I’d pop in to see Larry Herman’s ‘Clydeside 1974-76‘ at Street Level Photoworks. I’d seen this photograph of children on the roundabout by Red Road high flats and thought I’d see if there any more images of high rise (I’m currently working on a project entitled ‘Housing, Everyday Life and Wellbeing over the long term: Glasgow 1950-75‘ which considers people’s experiences of living in high rise flats in the city).

© Larry Herman: Red Road Flats, Glasgow

Chatting to the attendant resulted in me becoming ‘visitor of the day‘!

But really the highlight was the diverse images displayed and the quality of Herman’s photography. Just about all aspects of life feature; work, home and play. There’s everything from men working in the ship yards of the Clyde, and not just Glasgow but Greenock too, the coal fields of Lanarkshire and outside Chrysler car factory in Linwood. We see women at work in factories, building sites and their homes. There’s also photographs of community groups compiling local newsletters and trade union meetings and much more too.

Many images stick in my mind but this is my favourite. When we think of women’s role in the textiles industry in Scotland we might first think of Dundee jute workers or Paisley mill girls, but the story of the thousands of women who worked in machining factories running up everything from car seat covers to clothes has yet to be told.

If you’ve not been along already, I would highly recommend a visit – the exhibition is on until 27th of November.

Valerie Wright (University of Glasgow)

WHS Annual Conference – Registration

Registration for the Annual Conference in Aberdeen is now open.
Details of the programme, conference fee and how to register is below. The Sue Innes Memorial Lecture is free.

Saturday 31 October 2015
St Nicholas Room, Town House, Aberdeen

Tea & coffee will be available in the St Nicholas Room from 11am.

11.45: Lindy Moore ‘On Creating the Kingdom of God on Earth: the Spirituality of Isabella Fyvie Mayo’.

12.05 : Elizabeth Ritchie ‘Isabella Fraser Sage – Life as a Minister’s Wife in the C18th Highlands

12.30: Women’s Heritage Walk, organised by volunteers from Aberdeen Women’s Alliance walk group. This starts and finishes at the Town House.

1.15: Lunch break – Please note there are a range of options for eating close to the Town House

There will be a small bookstall.

2.00: The Sue Innes Memorial Lecture, Lesley Orr – “To Build the New Jerusalem” Women’s claims to equal citizenship in church and nation in 20thC Scotland

WHS AGM

Cost: £20 for the whole event. The Sue Innes Memorial Lecture is free.

To register, or for further details, please contact Alison McCall: womenshistoryscotland@gmail.com

Scottish Women’s Aid 40th Anniversary Heritage Project

It would be very helpful, not to mention much appreciated, if you were able to take just 5 mins to fill in this quick online Survey on the Scottish Women’s Aid 40th Anniversary Heritage Project.  Please see full details below and please also find the Survey link here:

https://hps.typeform.com/to/fQkKnZ 

 If you were also able to disseminate this link and these details through your own networks and for onward circulation, as appropriate, this would similarly be much appreciated.

International Women’s Day

Modern Votes for Women PinHappy International Women’s Day!

Here are some interesting links from around the interwebs:

 

 

 

 

 

The history of International Women’s Day

http://www.internationalwomensday.com/about.asp#.VPxHOHysWSp

http://www.un.org/womenwatch/feature/iwd/history.html

Events celebrating International Women’s Day

http://womenslibrary.org.uk/event/march-of-women/ (This event has passed, but members of WHS were present – hopefully GWL will post pics from the event soon!)

Why International Women’s Day is needed

http://www.theguardian.com/women-in-leadership/2015/mar/08/no-need-for-international-womens-day-what-world-do-you-live-in

http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2015/mar/08/emily-thornberry-equal-pay-act-overhaul?CMP=fb_gu

The status of women and women’s and gender history in academia

http://www.timeshighereducation.co.uk/news/gender-bias-rife-in-history-departments-says-report/2018937.article

http://www.theguardian.com/education/2015/feb/24/sexism-women-in-university-academics-feminism

Feel free to post other relevant links in the comments section!

What are your hopes for International Women’s Day 2015? How will you celebrate?

 

 

Women’s History Scotland Leah Leneman Essay Prize 2014 – Results!

Women’s History Scotland Leah Leneman Essay Prize 2014

 

We are pleased to announce the winner and runner-up of the Leah Leneman Essay Prize for 2014. The winner is Alice Glaze, University of Guelph, with Lin Cunningham, University of Glasgow, as runner-up. The competition again saw a very strong competition and we would like to thank all the applicants for providing such a rich and interesting array for the judges to consider.

 

Alice Glaze’s essay, ‘Women and Kirk Discipline: Prosecution, Negotiation and the Limits of Control’, is an interesting, well-crafted essay. It is clearly and elegantly written and professionally presented. The research questions and historiography are handled well, and in a nuanced sophisticated way, while the author presents sufficient context and background for a non-specialist in a professional and clear manner. Exemplary cases are used to good end, to support her arguments. An extensive bibliography demonstrates the extent and depth of the author’s reading. The central argument about the ambiguous nature of the control exercised by the Reformed Kirk over women and their bodies is well worked out, making effective use of some difficult source material.

 

Lin Cunningham’s essay, ‘Independent, Skilled and Enterprising Women in Business: The Dressmakers of Nineteenth-Century Glasgow’, draws on the renewed interest in women’s work and especially the position of businesswomen. This is a wide-ranging piece that deals effectively with a complex topic. Good use is made of a case study of the five MacFarlane sisters to illustrate various issues and changes during the century are well charted. A section on ‘defining success’ is particularly thoughtful. It is a well-written engaging and well-researched essay. The use of records and research is very good and her understanding of the period, historiography and issues is also admirable.

 

We would like to congratulate both Alice and Lin for their interesting and thought-provoking work, and hope to see both of these pieces published in due course. WHS members might like to know that several previous Leah Leneman prize essays have been published in the Journal of Scottish Historical Studies. The next competition will be in 2016, with a deadline in December.